Water Music New York at Schenectady // FREE

  • Mabee Farm Historic Site 1100 Main Street Rotterdam Junction, NY, 12150

A UNIQUE MUSICAL EXPERIENCE 200 YEARS IN THE MAKING... 

David Alan Miller, Conductor

Albany Symphony

Capital Repertory Theatre

HANDEL: Selections from "Water Music"

ANNIKA SOCOLOFSKY (Princeton University): Beyond The Pines, Erie Canal Bicentennial Commission (World Premiere)

AMERICAN FAVORITES including “Stars and Stripes,” and more!

Additional performances by Schenectady Symphony.

Rain Location: Check the WMNY Website for Updates

MEET THE COMPOSER

Annika Socolofsky (1990, Edinburgh) is a composer, avant-folk vocalist, and fiddler. Her music stems from the timbral nuance and inwards resonance of the human voice, and is communicated through mediums ranging from orchestral works to unaccompanied folk ballads.

Annika is a recipient of a 2014 Fromm Foundation Commission and a BMI Student Composer Award. She is a Mark Nelson Doctoral Fellow in composition at Princeton University.

MEET THE COLLABORATING ARTS PARTNER

Capital Repertory Theatre has a rich, local history of excellent entertainment and strong community relationships. Established in 1981, it came into existence through the dedication and perseverance of a group of Albany business, community and civic leaders. Donated labor, materials and expertise transformed the Grand Cash Market, an abandoned supermarket at 111 North Pearl Street, into what was to become the home of Albany's first professional resident theatre.

Capital Repertory Theatre has a rich, local history of excellent entertainment and strong community relationships. Established in 1981, it came into existence through the dedication and perseverance of a group of Albany business, community and civic leaders. Donated labor, materials and expertise transformed the Grand Cash Market, an abandoned supermarket at 111 North Pearl Street, into what was to become the home of Albany's first professional resident theatre.

ERIE CANAL FACT:

When "Clinton's Ditch" opened in 1825, Schenectady officials opted to not celebrate its Grand Opening out of fear it would take away business from their profitable ports along the Mohawk River.  The Erie Canal later helped Schenectady earn the reputation of being "the city that lights and hauls the world."